The life and contributions of anton van leeuwenhoek

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The life and contributions of anton van leeuwenhoek

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek Lived — Antonie van Leeuwenhoek is the somewhat improbable father of microbiology. A moderately educated owner of a textile business, he learned how to make his own unique microscopes which offered unparalleled magnification.

Using these microscopes he made a number of crucially important scientific discoveries, including single-celled animals and plants, bacteria, and spermatozoa. His microscopy methods were so finely tuned that after he discovered bacteria, this type of organism would not be observed again by any other scientist for over years.

His father was Philips Antonisz van Leeuwenhoek, a basket maker. His mother was Margaretha Bel van den Berch, whose prosperous family were beer brewers. His mother remarried, and Antonie spent some time living with an uncle.

Early life and career

His uncle was a lawyer and helped Antonie with basic literacy and numeracy, reinforcing the education he had received in local schools. By the time Antonie was 16, his step-father had also died. Antonie learned no languages other than Dutch, which suggests he was never expected to go to university: Business Career Inat the age of 16, Leeuwenhoek moved to the famous Dutch trading city of Amsterdam to begin work in a textile shop.

He learned his trade well and was promoted to the trusted position of cashier and book-keeper. Inaged 21, he returned to Delft, where he would spend the rest of his long life.

This was a significant year for Leeuwenhoek. Not only did he return to his hometown, but he got married, and, putting his business experience in Amsterdam into practice, he opened his own textile shop in Delft.

In addition to cloth he sold buttons, ribbons, and other accessories. Over the next few years Leeuwenhoek became an influential figure in Delft. In return for only a small amount of work — the actual physical work of the job was delegated to other people — he received a generous salary.

While running his shop and working for the city of Delft, Leeuwenhoek became a qualified land surveyor at about 40 years of age, just before he started his scientific work. He never told anyone how he made his lenses. The secret went with him to the grave. In fact, to throw competitors off the scent, he used to talk about how he had to grind glass for a very long time to make his lenses.

This was almost certainly not true. Glass Pearls People in the textiles trade had, for hundreds of years, used glass pearls — small spheres of glass — as lenses to examine cloth in fine detail. Leeuwenhoek used glass pearls frequently in his day-to-day business to examine the density of threads and the quality of cloth.

Micrographia In the great English scientist Robert Hooke released Micrographia, showcasing drawings he had made of the natural world seen through the lens of his microscope. Leeuwenhoek visited England in and most likely saw a copy of Micrographia: Importantly for Leeuwenhoek, it contained drawings Hooke had made of his microscopic examinations of cloth.

Micrographia contains a description of how a powerful microscope could be made using a single spherical lens — similar to the glass pearls Leeuwenhoek was already familiar with: Hooke himself did not use lenses made by this method because they were inconvenient: Hooke used a compound microscope one with two lenses which more closely resembles the microscopes we use today.

Lens Making Leeuwenhoek, however, was more than happy to use small, spherical lenses to make single-lens microscopes.

The life and contributions of anton van leeuwenhoek

He kept the details of how he manufactured his lenses secret, but today we can be reasonably sure that he did the following: The smaller the sphere, the greater the magnification.

When he started making lenses, Leeuwenhoek may have hoped to use them to examine textiles more closely than anyone had ever done before. Soon, however, he felt the same compulsion as Hooke to examine natural objects in never-before-seen detail. Remarkably, Leeuwenhoek could use his lenses to resolve details as small as 1.

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek looking through one of his tiny single-lens microscopes and recording his observations.

The life and contributions of anton van leeuwenhoek

The sample he is viewing is held within the body of the microscope. Painting by Ernest Boar.Oct 24,  · Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, (born October 24, , Delft, Netherlands—died August 26, , Delft), Dutch microscopist who was the first to observe bacteria and regardbouddhiste.com researches on lower animals refuted the doctrine of spontaneous generation, and his observations helped lay the foundations for the sciences of bacteriology and protozoology.

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek Biography Antonie van Leeuwenhoek is regarded as the ‘Father of Microbiology’ and is known for his pioneering works in relation to microorganisms. To know more about his childhood, profile, timeline and career read onPlace Of Birth: Delft.

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek was born on October 24, , in the small city of Delft in the Dutch Republic. His father was Philips Antonisz van Leeuwenhoek, a basket maker. His mother was Margaretha Bel van den Berch, whose prosperous family were beer brewers.

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek was born on October 24, , in the small city of Delft in the Dutch Republic. His father was Philips Antonisz van Leeuwenhoek, a basket maker. His mother was Margaretha Bel van den Berch, whose prosperous family were beer brewers.

The Dutch naturalist and microscopist Anton van Leeuwenhoek (), using simple microscopes of his own making, discovered bacteria, protozoa, spermatozoa, rotifers, Hydra and Volvox, and also parthenogenesis in aphids. Anton van Leeuwenhoek was born on Oct. 24, , at Delft. His schooling. Van Leeuwenhoek: His Life.

Anton Van Leeuwenhoek was born in , in the Dutch city of Delft; his only formal education was some elementary school. Instead of becoming a tradesman like his father.

Discovery Of Bacteria - by Antony van Leeuwenhoek